‘No-one can stop me’: The battle to stop Jens Jens-Stirling from entering the Australian political arena

‘No-one can stop me’: The battle to stop Jens Jens-Stirling from entering the Australian political arena

Media playback is unsupported on your device Media caption Jens Stirling says he will fight for Australia’s democracy article JensJensStirling, a former senator and former prime minister of Denmark, has been the subject of a major campaign to ban him from entering parliament for a decade.

He was the first candidate in the last election to appear on the ballot, which he won by less than 1,000 votes.

In the final round of voting, he won 6.5% of the vote, a figure which was down on the 2.8% he received in the first round.

But in the run-up to the September 22 vote, he said he was “not satisfied” with his results and urged voters to “not let themselves be intimidated” by the media.

“I will fight to get elected to the Australian Parliament,” he told a press conference on Tuesday.

“This will not be easy but I am determined to do so.”

In his speech, Mr Stirling said he would use his platform as a politician to “make an impact on how Australian people view the world”.

“The political system, the media, the politicians and the general public all have a role to play in shaping how the country views the world,” he said.

“It is up to us to decide what happens in our own minds.”

But he added that he did not intend to become a “media circus” and would instead seek to “transform Australian politics”.

Mr Stirling told his supporters that they had the power to “get the message out”.

“I believe that a change in our political landscape will result in a change of perspective and a change for the better,” he added.

“There is no reason why we should not be able to change our political climate, that is the power of the people.”

In my view, the world is changing and we need to be able, in my view at least, to take a stand and make an impact.

“But the Australian Electoral Commission (AEC) has warned that if the results of the election were to be invalidated, Mr JensStirths ban could be put in place.”

We have received information from people who have said that they may have received ballot papers which they have not yet received,” AEC spokesperson Michael D’Antonio said.

Mr Jensstroms ban has also drawn criticism from Australian politicians, including the Prime Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, who has said it was an “irresponsible” decision.

Mr Stirlings supporters say that his ban has been unfairly applied.”

What has been done to Jens is unfair,” former deputy prime minister and now former Liberal MP Bob Carr told ABC Radio.”

The Australian people have a right to know who is voting, who is participating in the elections and we are all equal in that respect.

“Mr Stirths victory in the September election was a surprise and a “tipping point” for the Australian media, he added, adding that it could “undermine the ability of Australian journalists to report the news”.”

This was the tipping point in the country’s democratic history, when the media were able to speak freely in public, without fear of retribution,” Mr Carr said.

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