How to read the news: What do you see and what do you hear?

How to read the news: What do you see and what do you hear?

A couple weeks ago, my family and I took the bus from our home in St. Louis, Missouri, to New Orleans to catch the New Orleans Pelicans’ game against the Miami Heat.

As we waited for the bus to arrive, I noticed a huge banner in the window of the car, with the headline, “NOLA BIZARRE: PORTER VOTE TO STOP AUSTIN KARL.

PLEASE.”

It was the only thing that made any sense.

The entire bus was packed with a crowd of more than 20,000 people, who were chanting, “Stop the Trump!”

The headline was clearly aimed at President Donald Trump, but the implication was clear: I had voted for a man who had insulted a reporter and a woman who was a reporter.

In an effort to understand how people felt about Trump, I started to think about the people who had voted him into office.

I began to realize that there were people on the bus who felt just as passionately about the election as I did.

In the months since, many people have asked me, “Why did I vote for Trump?”

I wanted to share the stories of people like me, and I wanted people to know that I was not alone.

When we’re talking about how we live our lives and how we vote, the people in our lives who we think we know the most about and care about the most are often the ones who are the least informed and least informed about what’s happening around them.

In a sense, our democracy is broken.

We’re told to be informed, but that’s not always the case.

In many cases, people who are supposed to be able to know the facts and the answers to our questions are often left to wonder.

In some cases, we’re told that we’re just too stupid to know what’s going on.

We are told to vote based on who we know best, which is often a myth.

We aren’t allowed to vote until we have the answers.

In short, our government is so stacked against us that we are often powerless to do anything about it.

I’ve been told that I should be grateful for my citizenship because it means that I’m not voting for Trump.

It means that it doesn’t matter who’s in power, because I can’t possibly know anything about their policies or their plans to govern.

I can only speculate about what they might be doing with our taxes and what they’re planning to do with our money, but I don’t know.

I have no idea what they want from us.

In fact, I’m fairly certain that my own policies, my own priorities, my policies are what makes me feel powerless.

When I get to work, I usually get my work done in about 15 minutes, and then I’m gone.

In order to stay in the workforce, I have to make sure that I have the time and energy to keep up with the work of the government, which in this case has been the Trump administration.

For example, I know that when I’m on the road, I should not go on the Internet.

If I do, I am going to get my information from Twitter and Facebook, not the news media, which has always been the only source for information.

And I know the reason why I’m being so distracted: because I’m a journalist.

I’m working on stories that affect the lives of millions of people every day, and there’s not a single day that goes by where I don

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